wikipedia

Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #198

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, Solve For Interesting, the author of Complete Web Monitoring, Managing Bandwidth: Deploying QOS in Enterprise Networks and Lean Analytics), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist’s Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person “must see”.

Check out these six links that we’re recommending to one another:

  • The Uncomfortable – Facebook. “This set of artifacts, designed by architect, Katerina Kamprani, will drive you bonkers. She takes everyday items, and then changes them to render them completely useless. It’s definitely art. Most of these things could only come from a really twisted, deviant mind. OCD trigger warning.” (Alistair for Hugh). 
  • Motivation Wave – BJ Fogg. “As any marketer knows, changing behaviors is hard. Whether you’re trying to improve someone’s health, or convince them to buy your product, changing habits is tough. Stanford‘s BJ Fogg has spent a lot of time researching this in the university’s Persuasive Technology Lab. That ‘persuasive technology’ is a field of study in the first place says a lot about the world in which we live.” (Alistair for Mitch).
  • Demo of Beat It composed using only Michael Jackson’s voice – Rhythm Of The Tide. “I was going to send Alistair an amazing xkcd comic this week (you can look it up on Google: xkcd frequency), but Alistair has probably seen it, and will probably see 22 more amazing xkcd comics this year. Instead, I am sending this, which is more of a one-of-a-kind sort of thing. Michael Jackson, apparently, never truly mastered playing instruments, but he composed and arranged – note for note – in his head. He would record and layer vocals/acapella versions of his songs, using his voice for all the instruments. Here is the amazing vocal arrangement he did for Beat It.” (Hugh for Alistair).   
  • A Growing Number of E-Commerce Sites Are Moving Into Print – AdWeek. “You know what technology has great, finely-honed UI and really, really good user engagement? Paper. Here’s a surprising development: web/ecommerce companies starting to put out old fashioned print catalogs.” (Hugh for Mitch).
  • Knowledge transfer between computers: Computers teach each other Pac-Man – Science Daily. “Have they found that plane that’s still missing? I watch CNN relentlessly when I am on the road… and, I was on the road quite a bit this week. I am in no way trying to minimize the fact that this plane must be found (or the tragedy surrounding it for the families), but I’m amazed that the 24-hour news cycle spins a ‘breaking news’ moment of this missing plane with nothing truly ‘breaking’ at all. Instead, stuff like this comes out and you don’t even hear about it. It turns out that computers can actually train each other and teach skills to one another. What? No way! Way.” (Mitch for Alistair).
  • The Wikipedia For Numbers Just Made My Job Easier, But It Needs Your Help To Be Even Better – Business Insider. “Have you ever heard of Meterfy? Me neither. In fact, most people haven’t, so it ain’t as robust as Wikipedia… but it could be. Yes, this is a Wikipedia for numbers. A way for people to post and share anything and everything related to numbers. This is a smart, cool and fun place. I sincerely hope it takes off. A Wikipedia for numbers. Makes sense to me.” (Mitch for Hugh).

Now it’s your turn: in the comment section below pick one thing that you saw this week that inspired you and share it.

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Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #191

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, Solve For Interesting, the author of Complete Web Monitoring, Managing Bandwidth: Deploying QOS in Enterprise Networks and Lean Analytics), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist’s Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person “must see”.

Check out these six links that we’re recommending to one another:

  • The Little Girl from the 1981 LEGO Ad is All Grown Up, and She’s Got Something to Say – Women You Should Know. “This article revisits Lego‘s iconic ad showing a pigtailed redhead playing with Lego. It provoked all kinds of reactions online — from those lauding it for pointing out gender bias, to those wondering why liking ‘girly things’ is somehow less worthy. Wherever you stand on the issue, it’s interesting to see how Lego has changed over the last few decades.” (Alistair for Hugh).
  • Dinner Party – Oliver Walker. “I’m a big fan of changing formats to shift how people interact. It’s something I try to do at Bitnorth. But I’ve never taken it this far. Here’s a social-experiment-slash-art-piece that investigates just how much of our interactions are nonverbal. I really want to try this sometime.” (Alistair for Mitch).
  • Hi, I’m Jack – jack.minardi.org. “Take a healthy dollop of BitTorrent, add a dash of BitCoin, shake until you get a decentralized browser with decentralized domain ownership: SyncNet. Early, experimental days. Fascinating direction for the ‘Web’, as the original idea of a independent, decentralized Internet is slowly getting gobbled up by a small number of mega-centralized behemoths (Facebook/Google/Amazon/Verizon etc).” (Hugh for Alistair).
  • Conrad Black: This anemic recovery – National Post.Conrad Black is the most famous ex-convict former newspaper baron Canada has produced to date. Since his release from US prison (for various fraudulent uses of company money), Baron Black of Crossharbour (long story) has been penning long-winded and delightfully grouchy essays for Canada’s National Post newspaper (the right-leaning paper he founded back when he was a newspaper baron). Black is one hell of a personality, whatever you think of him, and a renaissance man to boot. His articles are pompous and wide-ranging, and pretty great reads. Here’s one about the 2008 economic collapse and Canada and a few other things.” (Hugh for Mitch).
  • This Dad Coloured-In His Kid’s Art To Kill Time On Business Trips – We Interviewed Him – Lost At E Minor. “If you ever have those moments when you think that you’re not that great of a father, don’t worry because there’s always the Internet to confirm it for you. You may think that you’re an awesome dad, but you’re not this awesome. Of course, I’m kidding. I’m sure everyone is a great parent (including you, Alistair), but this hyper-creative dad takes it to a whole new level in what can only be described as the most heart-warming story that I have read all week. Truly beautiful and powerful.” (Mitch for Alistair).
  • Wikipedia vs. the Small Screen – The New York Times. “Sometimes you read something on the Internet that gives you pause. Most people (myself included) take Wikipedia for granted. After all, I don’t contribute, edit or even correct anything on the platform. Yet, I use it constantly (and I love it). Sure, I am more than happy to support them on their annual giving campaign, but I take more than I give when it comes to Wikipedia. Well, what happens in a mobile world where creating and editing content is not as easy as it is in a Web-browser-based world? I had not thought about this, but Wikipedia is going to be in lot of trouble if they can’t figure out how to encourage people to contribute to Wikipedia in a world where most people are simply using their smartphones for content.” (Mitch for Hugh).

Now it’s your turn: in the comment section below pick one thing that you saw this week that inspired you and share it.

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Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #175

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, Solve For Interesting, the author of Complete Web Monitoring, Managing Bandwidth: Deploying QOS in Enterprise Networks and Lean Analytics), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist’s Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person “must see”.

Check out these six links that we’re recommending to one another:

  • How to do good talks at conferences – The Startup Toolshed. “It’s the middle of the fall conference season. In gearing up for O’Reilly’s Strata, I’ve spoken with dozens of sponsors and keynote speakers, helping them to hone their presentations. My one go-to rule is this: ‘If your audience won’t feel smarter for tweeting your slide to their network, delete it.’ This post by Makeshift‘s Nick Marsh tackles the problem of salesmanship that inevitably infects any event as it grows. It’s a great checklist for speakers and event organizers.” (Alistair for Hugh).
  • Stay Put, Young Man – Washington Monthly. “Americans used to be a nomadic country, moving around both physically and economically. That’s changing. They don’t go West, and they seldom move up. ‘Between the 1980s and the 2000s, the percentage of young adults (those aged eighteen to twenty-four) who migrated across state lines declined by 41 percent.’ This piece in the Washington Monthly looks at the changing demographics of US citizens, rethinking a nation we think we know.” (Alistair for Mitch).
  • Why We Don’t Care About Saving Our Grandchildren From Climate Change  – Time. “Unless we do something about climate change, we are all doomed. We won’t do anything about climate change.” (Hugh for Alistair).
  • Resource riches pull Canada into geopolitical battle it can’t afford to lose – Financial Post. “Unless Canada does something about aggressively exploiting its arctic oil riches, Canada is doomed to be in the poorhouse. But. Wait. What about climate change? My head hurts.” (Hugh for Mitch).
  • Confessions of a Drone Warrior – GQ. “When killing people becomes like a video game (maybe easier), we have to be able to take a step back and ask ourselves, ‘what really is going on here?’ There has been a ton of ink on the topic of soldiers living in the basement of a Nevada military base blasting enemies away thousands of mile away with a joystick. This is a personal account of one such young individual. It’s kind of chilling to think that these people are handling drone strikes in the morning, heading to Taco Bell for lunch and then off to some cool concert in the evening, as if they just worked a shift at Target.” (Mitch for Alistair).
  • The decline of Wikipedia – MIT Technology Review. Every organization has its politics, in-fighting and challenges. Ones that are more open, non-hierarchical and Web-based open up a whole new level of issues. Beyond that, it seems like people just aren’t that into Wikipedia anymore. For people like Hugh and I (who love all things Wikipedia), this is somewhat heartbreaking. Personally, I use Wikipedia countless times on a day-to-day basis and I trust the content on there more than the vast majority of gunk I come across in general Web searches. Still, I make sure to double-check facts, etc… I love Wikipedia. I don’t want it to disappear. I hope whatever it is being challenged with gets resolved. Fast.” (Mitch for Hugh).

Now it’s your turn: in the comment section below pick one thing that you saw this week that inspired you and share it.

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10 Brand New Books That You Should Read

Suddenly, I don’t know where to start.

It’s like the brains of the world converged, had a meeting and decided to overwhelm us with a mass amount of brand new books to get our brains frothing. This is, without question, a tough time to figure out which brand new business book you should start with. My Kindle runneth over with books that must be consumed, contemplated and implemented. All of these books have either just come out (in the past month, or so) or will be coming out at any moment.

Go get your credit card. Here are 10 brand new business books that you should read (in alphabetical order): 

  1. The Authentic Swing – Notes From The Writing Of A First Novel by Steven Pressfield. I am an unabashed fan of Steve Pressfield. If you write or create anything and have not picked up his books, The War of Art and Do The Work, you are really missing out on something special. In this book, Pressfield walks you through how he came up with and wrote his smash bestseller, The Legend of Bagger Vance. The Authentic Swing arrived today, and odds are very strong that every other book on this list will be dropped down a notch until this one gets chewed up. Also of note, Pressfield will be appearing on Oprah‘s Super Soul Sunday series this coming Sunday. If you struggle with getting inspired, starting a project or getting to another level in your creative thinking, you don’t want to miss this book. Pressfield also launched a two-part online video series to promote The Authentic Swing that walks through his The Foolscap Method. Amazing stuff. Here’s a conversation we had back in 2011: SPOS #251 – Do The Work With Steven Pressfield.
  2. David And Goliath – Underdogs, Misfits, And The Art Of Battling Giants by Malcolm Gladwell. This is my current read. The book will be out on October 1st, 2013 and I am enjoying it immensely. If you’re not a fan of Gladwell, it is doubtful that this one will win you over. Personally, I like the way that he weaves research and academics with everyday people stories. I also like how he challenges the status quo with a different point of view. Insights, perspective and an amazing writing style makes this one a necessity for your book collection. Let’s face it, walking around with a Malcolm Gladwell book also makes you look smart and cool. Who doesn’t want that? ;)
  3. Die Empty – Unleash Your Best Work Every Day by Todd Henry. This is Todd Henry’s latest book. For my dollar, it is one of the best titled books on creativity to date. But, as you know, we never judge a book by its cover (or title). Thankfully, Henry fully delivers on this one. It’s a veritable page-turner of insights and new ways to think about how to soak the most creative juices out of your life. People seem to think that creativity is based on scarcity. Die Empty will help you better understand that it is a model of abundance. You just have to better understand how to harness it. This book comes out tomorrow, so don’t delay. Here’s a conversation we had back in 2011: SPOS #259 – Accidentally Creative With Todd Henry. Plus, look for an upcoming episode of Six Pixels of Separation – The Twist Image Podcast where we discuss Die Empty.
  4. Epic Content Marketing – How to Tell a Different Story, Break through the Clutter, and Win More Customers by Marketing Less by Joe Pulizzi. In a world where everyone is talking about the merits of content marketing, Joe Pulizzi is one of the true, experienced voices in the space. I read an earlier draft of this book and was amazed by the depth of it. If you’re looking at how to bulk up your content marketing strategy, or where to get started, this is a great primer and is right up there with Content Rules. Here’s a conversation we had back in 2012: SPOS #289 – Content Marketing With Joe Pulizzi.
  5. Remote – Office Not Required by Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson. The guys from 37 Signals blazed the bestselling book lists with their opus, Rework. Now, they’re back with a book and topic that is near and dear to my heart. There are days when my office is my MacBook Air and iPhone, and there are days when my office is the physical space that we occupy at Twist Image. How would we build, design and market brands if we all worked remotely? I’m not sure it would be as successful. This probably isn’t a zero sum game, so I am curious to see how Jason and David tackle this issue as our work environment changes from day to day. This book comes out on October 29th. I don’t have it, yet. 
  6. Smarter Than You Think – How Technology Is Changing Our Minds For The Better by Clive Thompson. Another book that I bought, but have yet to tackle. Thompson’s articles in Wired Magazine are always amazing. There is a massive technology backlash underway. A lot of it stems from comments like Google is making us all dumber or that Wikipedia isn’t always perfectly correct, and we’re loosing our ability to learn because all of this technology and inter-connectedness. Thompson doesn’t agree, and he lays out his lucid reasoning in this important book. Personally, I can’t wait to dive in!
  7. Thinking In New Boxes – A New Paradigm For Business Creativity by Luc De Brabandere and Alan Iny. Don’t be fooled by the notion that these two Boston Consulting Group consultants would struggle with helping businesses to figure out new ways to be creative and innovative. This book reads like an instruction manual for businesses to review their own strategies and figure out how to out-innovate those who seek to disrupt their industries. It is well-researched and tells some amazing stories of brands that have discovered non-obvious but complimentary new business models and have managed to create a sustainable competitive advantage. I talked up the book with Alan Iny right here: SPOS #374 – Inside The Box Outside? Outside The Box? New Boxes With Alan Iny.
  8. Unlabel – Selling You Without Selling Out by Marc Ecko. I am still waiting on the physical version of this book from the fashion, pop culture and art icon. I had the pleasure of interviewing Ecko at a mastermind session earlier this year, and we recently took some time to discuss his latest project: this book. The conversation with him will be published this coming week on the Six Pixels podcast, but he is one person who understands (and can explain) what it means to build an authentic brand. Many people talk the talk, but Ecko walks the walk… time and time again. If you’re interested in brands and how they work, order a copy of Unbrand. This book comes out on October 1st.
  9. Without Their Permission: How the 21st Century Will Be Made, Not Managed by Alexis Ohanian. I have been hearing about this book for well over a year. Alexis and I share the same publisher and editor. I’m really curious to read this book (which also comes out on October 1st) from the co-founder of Reddit, Hipmunk and more. He’s a passionate startup guy and investor (deeply rooted with Y Combinator) and this book is all about using the Web for good. I’m fairly confident that this one will live up to its hype… if not, he’ll get mauled on Reddit. I doubt he will let that happen ;)
  10. The Year Without Pants – WordPress.com And The Future Of Work by Scott Berkun. This is another one that I have recently purchased and can’t wait to attack. Scott has written books on everything from productivity (Making Things Happen) to how to be a great public speaker (Confessions Of A Public Speaker). I’m excited to see where this journey leads. Berkun writes with a very fresh, direct and powerful style. He makes reading easy… and it’s a welcome break from some of the more laborious reads.

Some others are coming soon as well…

Gary Vaynerchuk has his latest book, Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook – How To Tell Your Story In A Noisy Social World on November 26th and Scott Stratten (Mr. Unmarketing) is set to launch, QR Codes Kill Kittens: How to Alienate Customers, Dishearten Employees, and Drive Your Business into the Ground on October 7th. I am sure that there are other gems that I have missed.

So, what brand new books are you waiting on?

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Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #166

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, Solve For Interesting, the author of Complete Web Monitoring, Managing Bandwidth: Deploying QOS in Enterprise Networks and Lean Analytics), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist’s Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person “must see”.

Check out these six links that we’re recommending to one another:

  • The Histomap – David Rumsey Map Collection. “I hadn’t seen this epic map until a Slate article by Rebecca Onion explained its history. It’s a gigantic, unified map of history–a four-thousand-year cheat-sheet. While it was first revealed nearly a century ago, it seems strangely modern, full of potential for a navigable, interactive application or life-feed.” (Alistair for Hugh).
  • Slow Ideas – The New Yorker. “Some notions spread like wildfire; others take decades to catch on. In this The New Yorker piece, Atul Gawande considers why. I love the contrast between anesthesia (fast) and antiseptic (slow) and it’s an example I will likely us often; I’m sure that someone as interested in how messages disseminate as you are will find it equally useful.” (Alistair for Mitch).
  • There’s a Hole in My Bucket – Wikipedia. “In which Wikipedia wins the award for the most pedantic page on the Internet, for the week of August 24, 2013.” (Hugh for Alistair).
  • Ballet dancers in random situations – Leenks. “With the NSA spying on everything we do on the Internet, Egypt falling to pieces, UK spies smashing newspaper hard drives, Syria falling to pieces, journalists’ partners getting detained under terrorist laws, Fukushima leaking radioactive water, fracking, Quebec sinkholes, bankrupt exploding railways, prorogued parliament, for starters, I’ve had my fill of shitty news this summer. Instead: ballet dancers in random situations.” (Hugh for Mitch).
  • What Is Medium? – The Atlantic. “I was speaking with Anil Dash this past week at HubSpot‘s Inbound 2013 summit in Boston and we somehow got on the topic of Medium. Medium is a new publishing platform founded by two of the people who created Twitter. It’s all the buzz now. I was curious as to what Anil thought it was, and if there was any merit to it (he actually blogged about it right here: What Medium Is). Sure, the content is stellar, but what makes it anything more than WordPress or The Huffington Post? Is the hype there simply because of who created it or is there something more… creeping beneath the surface that isn’t so obvious? The Atlantic investigates (and, make sure to read Anil’s piece too!).” (Mitch for Alistair).
  • Then and Now: Photos of Real Places Mentioned in Fiction – Flavorwire. “I love features like this. They hunt down the moments and real spaces that took place in some of fiction’s greatest work and show us what it looks like today. As a marketing professional, I’m all about the modernization of our world (and I love technology), but it can be jaw-dropping to see just how much change has transpired in a few short years.” (Mitch for Hugh).

Now it’s your turn: in the comment section below pick one thing that you saw this week that inspired you and share it.

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Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #156

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, Solve For Interesting, the author of Complete Web Monitoring, Managing Bandwidth: Deploying QOS in Enterprise Networks and Lean Analytics), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist’s Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person “must see”.

Check out these six links that we’re recommending to one another:

  • What is “derp”? The answer is technical – Noahpinion. “Derp is one of those words that started on the Internet, which is really just a giant meme-minting machine, after all. It defies definition–like modern art, you know it when you see it. Well, here’s a working explanation from Noah Smith, and it turns out it’s about Bayes’ Theorem.” (Alistair for Hugh).
  • How To Sell Coke To People Who Have Never Had A Sip – Planet Money. “Brand marketing hasn’t really changed, and venerated brands like Coke can usually coast on a market where everyone’s familiar with their ubiquitous red-and-white swirled logo. So finding a country that hasn’t had Coca-Cola is like finding a lost tribe, untainted by the modern world. This NPR story looks at bringing the soft drink back to Myanmar after a 60-year hiatus.” (Alistair for Mitch).
  • Chekhov’s gun – Wikipedia. “The Snowden revelations of massive spying on the American population (and indeed: on anyone who uses Facebook, Google, Yahoo etc) made me think of Chekhov’s law. If a gun is hanging on the wall in Act I, it better go off by the end of the play. And in real life: if you put all of your data on servers someone else controls, then you can bet that someone will be looking at it.” (Hugh for Alistair).
  • John le Carré Interview – CBC Books. John le Carré‘s writing defined the cold-war spy novel: murky, morally ambiguous, and filled with rogues and fallen zealots. He’s always been a thoughtful writer, examining the stories those in power tell us, and the hazier reality of things. I wish this interview had taken place a couple of weeks later than it did, so that the former MI6 man could have commented on Edward Snowden and the leaks about NSA‘s surveillance programs. He discusses all of it anyway – reminding us that we knew this was happening all along.” (Hugh for Mitch).
  • Coding Is Coming To Every Industry You Can Think Of, Time To Start Learning It Now – Co.EXIST. “I have very young kids. When the conversation about language comes up, I’m always eager for my kids to be trilingual. I want my kids to to be learning English, French… and Code. The fact is that we’re building a brave new digital world right now. Not making our children literate in this new language of architecture, urban planning and infrastructure for the digital spaces is akin to not teaching them how to read and write. I’d argue that we all could do a better job of learning some of the basics of coding.”
  • How To Be Prolific: Guidelines For Getting It Done From Joss Whedon – Co.CREATE. “There has been a lot of talk about the whole quality over quantity debate when it comes to brands creating content (more on that here: Marketers Are Not Publishing Enough Content). The title of this article puts a wet blanket on the debate, if you ask me. If you want to get stuff done, if you want to get some great ideas to percolate to the top, you have to be prolific. You have to constantly be pushing yourself (and your content out there). This doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t have a strategy. It just means that once you know why you’re doing something (and what you want out of it), you have to be prolific. And for the record, prolific doesn’t mean lots of crap. Powerful stuff.” (Mitch for Hugh).

Now it’s your turn: in the comment section below pick one thing that you saw this week that inspired you and share it.

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Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #149

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, Solve For Interesting, the author of Complete Web Monitori…

Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #137

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, the author of Complete Web Monitoring and Managing Bandwid…

The Most Exciting Thing Happening In Digital Right Now

It’s not Twitter. It’s not Facebook. It’s not YouTube.

It’s Kickstarter.

I fell madly, deeply in love with Kickstarter when I first heard about it back in 2009 (you can read more about my love for it here: Kickstart Your Own Economy). It seems like t…

Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #100

93Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, the author of Complete Web Monitoring and Managing Bandw…

Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #87

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, the author of Complete Web Monitoring and Managing Bandwid…

Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #83

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, the author of Complete Web Monitoring and Managing Bandwid…

Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #81

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, the author of Complete Web Monitoring and Managing Bandwid…

Kickstart Your Own Economy

Can you test the market for a product without ever producing it?

CW&T is a self-described, "teeny design studio in Brooklyn" that is basically a two-person operation – designers Che-Wei Wang and Taylor Levy. I have a certain kinship with…

Spamming Mechanisms

It used to be a very clear line between what was considered spam and what was not.

Things have changed over the course of the past decade. I’m with the Wikipedia definition of spam: "to send unsolicited bulk messages indiscriminately," but I…