forbes

Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #182

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, Solve For Interesting, the author of Complete Web Monitoring, Managing Bandwidth: Deploying QOS in Enterprise Networks and Lean Analytics), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist’s Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person “must see”.

Check out these six links that we’re recommending to one another:

  • Meet The ‘Assassination Market’ Creator Who’s Crowdfunding Murder With Bitcoins – Forbes. “The only way this headline could sound more like a cyberpunk novel is if assassins were required to use 3D printed swords with nano-sharp edges.” (Alistair for Hugh).
  • Pantene Breaks Down Every Sexist Workplace Stereotype in One Ad – Time. “I just came back from the Lean Startup conference, run by Sarah Milstein and Eric Ries. It was an excellent event, in part because they really focused on diversity. The speakers ranged in color, gender, and age, far from the usual lineup at conferences. There’s a great write-up of how they did it, too In this ad spot, Pantene pokes fun at how common workplace stereotypes are; it’s eye-opening and really well done.” (Alistair for Mitch).
  • Die, Selfish Gene, Die – Aeon Magazine. “Did you know that grasshoppers (quiet, solitary, peaceful eaters) are actually the *same animal* as locusts (noisy, swarming, voracious)? In times of scarcity, certain species of grasshoppers transform into locusts, changing not just their behavior, but also their physical attributes: their legs and wings get shorter, their color changes, even their brains change, growing to manage the more social interactions of a locust horde. This phase change is the result of what scientists call ‘gene expression’ – the genes themselves don’t change, but the way they express themselves – how they shape the animal and its behavior – does. Genetics, it turns out, is more complicated than we thought, and much of what we learned in biology class is wrong.” (Hugh for Alistair).
  • David, Grostern & Lozeau: Imagining Montreal As A City-State – National Post. “This one is for the locals. I love Montreal. It’s an amazing city. Speaking personally, I came out of the uncertainties of the mid-nineties (when Quebec voters narrowly defeated a referendum to separate from Canada) with a sense of growing optimism about Montreal, and I moved back here (from NYC) in 2002. Montreal seemed on the rise: a city increasingly comfortable in two languages, well-positioned to bridge Europe and North America as a nexus of trade and culture, had plenty of natural resources (including a plentiful supply of hydro-electricity) keeping the province wealthy, more universities per capita than any other city in Canada, and a kind of off-center political climate that made things exciting. But my optimism over the last decade, and especially the past few years, is waning. Quebec seems increasingly isolationist, and keeps implementing (or threatening to implement) policies that will chip away at Quebec’s ability to compete in the world, not to mention its global reputation. Defending language and culture are surely important, but if these defenses result in a decline in Quebec’s vibrancy and wealth – then we all need to ask ourselves some questions. Maybe the solution is for Montreal to go it alone?” (Hugh for Mitch).
  • Jony Ive’s Secret Coffee Ritual – The Blog Of Tim Ferriss. “I know how much Alistair likes someone who is dedicated to the point of obsession about a topic. I also know how much more Alistair likes it when that passion is on something obscure or weird. Well, this one may just take the cake. Listen, I love a great cafe au lait as much as the next person and there is nothing quite as amazing as a killer cup of java meshed with great conversation and ideation, but this is taking things to a whole other level. If I’m not mistaken, Apple may be able to create these products that fascinate humanity because the design team is caffeinated unlike any other human being on the planet. If they care this much about the coffee, it’s no wonder that their hardware is so glaringly gorgeous.” (Mitch for Alistair).
  • David Simon: ‘There are now two Americas. My country is a horror show’ – The Guardian. “If you live in the United States or visit it on a more frequent basis, it’s hard not to read this piece by David Simon and not be moved. Most people know Simon as the creator of the amazing TV series, The Wire. If you do some quick searches of him on YouTube, you will also discover someone who frequently gives speeches on the state of our states. In this piece, you’ll get a vibe for the kind of presentations he gives and how he will (hopefully) get you thinking very differently about the rich and the poor, and about capitalism and social impact. Powerful, powerful stuff.” (Mitch for Hugh).

Now it’s your turn: in the comment section below pick one thing that you saw this week that inspired you and share it.

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The Power To Self Promote

Episode #379 of Six Pixels of Separation – The Twist Image Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to.

I have known Dan Schawbel for over a decade. I have also had the pleasure of watching him blossom into a marketing juggernaut and passionat…

Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #160

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, Solve For Interesting, the author of Complete Web Monitoring, Managing Bandwidth: Deploying QOS in Enterprise Networks and Lean Analytics), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist’s Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person “must see”.

Check out these six links that we’re recommending to one another:

  • Sid Meier: The Father of Civilization – Kotaku. “An amazing look at Sid Meier, the nicest, smartest guy in gaming, who has sailed relatively unscathed through the ups and downs of the gaming industry because, well, he’s just that good.” (Alistair for Hugh).
  • Let Us Blaze New Trails – Letters of Note. “Last week I looked at Mad Men. Here’s a letter from a slightly mad ad-man, Bill Bernbach, which was forwarded to me by friends on two coasts. In it, Bernbach laments the death of creativity that often accompanies a growth in size. In a software-eats-everything world, companies that valued scale are quickly eclipsed by those who favor cycle time and disruption. This letter may explain why.” (Alistair for Mitch).
  • The coming crisis for the oceans – The Science Show. “A sobering look at the state of our oceans, from Callum Roberts, author of The Ocean of Life, interviewed by Robyn Williams on Australia Radio National‘s The Science Show.” (Hugh For Alistair).
  • The Pageview Race – Magellan Media. “My friend and colleague Brian O’Leary takes a critical look at Josh Sternberg‘s post at Digiday, about Who’s Winning at volume publishing. Sternberg awards the gold medal to Forbes.com, which produces the most volume of content per editorial staff (ratio 1:8). Brian asks a good question: if advertising rates continue to fall, is ‘winning’ at volume publishing winning anything? Or, is it better to start thinking of ‘content’ as ‘part of a value chain, but not all of it.’ The example given is AirBnB‘s content strategy, seen as a model of new ways of thinking about using content for marketing, rather than content as a vehicle for advertising”. (Hugh for Mitch).
  • Zipcar For Office Space: A New Service Lets You Rent A Desk By The Hour – Co.DESIGN. “This past week, Alistair, Hugh and I spent a good chunk of time at International Startup Festival held in Montreal. Our mutual friend, Julien Smith was along for the ride. Julien has been making a lot of noise (and raising significant capital) for his startup, Breather. As the company begins to roll out these available spaces in urban centers that members can access, you can begin to feel how significant of an opportunity this might be. This Fast Company piece tickles at what could, ultimately, become a whole new way to look at spaces, how we live, work and more. At first, I couldn’t wrap my head around what, exactly, Julien was trying to do with this startup. Now, I can’t stop thinking about how interesting it truly is.” (Mitch for Alistair). 
  • 23 Books You Didn’t Read In High School But Actually Should – BuzzFeed. “I was doing my best to not get sucked in by the seductively ridiculous headlines that BuzzFeed pumps through the tubes. When I saw someone post this link on Twitter, I could not resist. I spent a good chunk of my elementary and high school days daydreaming of wanting to be anywhere else. Thankfully, I never let school get in the way of my education. We’re given reading lists and the like all of the way through school. Some of us read the books, but most of us probably just skimmed the surface of the content. I was about to make the foray into reading some fiction this summer. I was considering the latest from Neil Gaiman, before this list came along. It’s somewhat depressing that I own, but haven’t read a lot of these books…and I should… and so should you (in case you haven’t). And, even if you read these in high school, I’m pretty sure they’re that much more magical now that we’re adults.” (Mitch for Hugh).  

Now it’s your turn: in the comment section below pick one thing that you saw this week that inspired you and share it.

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Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #155

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, Solve For Interesting, the author of Complete Web Monitoring, Managing Bandwidth: Deploying QOS in Enterprise Networks and Lean Analytics), Hugh McGuire (PressBooks, LibriVox, iambik and co-author of Book: A Futurist’s Manifesto) and I decided that every week the three of us are going to share one link for one another (for a total of six links) that each individual feels the other person “must see”.

Check out these six links that we’re recommending to one another:

  • It’s a beautiful thing when free data meets free analytics – GigaOm. “I hesitated to post something this hardcore geeky to our weekly list, but it’s worth the investment. Last week I sent something about Jaron Lanier, and his worries over the concentration of the data of the many in the hands of the few. GigaOm‘s Derrick Harris points out that BigML (a machine learning service) and Quandl (an open data provider) have teamed up. You may not know other open services like openstreetmap.org (an open version of Google Maps) and CommonCrawl (an open repository of the web’s contents), but collectively, tools like these create a ‘shadow’ version of the Internet tools on which we rely (think OpenOffice versus Microsoft Office). As people want to analyze the chaff of their digital lives–without the scrutiny and profiteering of commercial tools and social networks–these kinds of tools will become increasingly important.” (Alistair for Hugh).
  • Timelapse – Time. “This Google/Time Magazine interactive feature shows an amazing amount of detail on how our planet is changing. It makes me realize that, for maybe the first time, we have the visibility from space to see; the computing power to analyze; and the networking to distribute a truly global view of our planet. Some of the imagery is a sobering reminder that we’ve achieved such power at a high–maybe unrecoverable–cost.” (Alistair for Mitch).
  • Could IBM Be The Next Google? – Forbes. “Big data for the people (Google) vs. big data for companies. Is IBM (a company with astounding staying power) poised to bring big data smarts into their vast network of huge corporate accounts?” (Hugh for Alistair).
  • Facebook users in Japan losing interest and heading for the exits – RocketNews24. Facebook is invincible, right? How could a company that controls the online social interaction of 500 gazillion people ever lose relevance? Well, take a look at what’s happening in Japan: a 20% decline in Facebook users in the past 5 months. In it’s place, LINE has emerged as the dominant social networking site in Japan, with 41.5 million Japanese users (vs. 14 million for Facebook, down from 19 million at the end of 2012). Will LINE grab the imagination of Facebook users in North America? Maybe not, but something else will, eventually.” (Hugh for Mitch).
  • How does Apple keep secrets so well? – Quora. “I spent the past few weeks in Toronto doing media appearances for the launch of CTRL ALT Delete. I found myself one night in a restaurant sitting next to a couple. One of them works at a competitive agency and they’re pitching for the same piece of business. This individual was talking – in detail – about a lot of confidential information. Both about the agency they work for, their team members and the client that they are hoping to represent. None of it positive. It made me wonder how a company like Apple manages to keep things so secret and then – poof! – here comes this amazing little piece of content on Quora.” (Mitch for Alistair).
  • Is Quartz the Very Model of a Modern Publisher? – DigiDay. “I often get asked what traditional print media publishers must do to remain viable in this digital age. There are not many answers or examples to point to other than the Huffington Post or BuzzFeed (and those two answers seem to make hardcore journalists squirm). Quartz could be the beginning of an answer (the jury isn’t out yet). For my dollar, this is less about the content and how it looks on a smartphone versus a computer screen and much more about finding a sustainable business model that isn’t predicated on advertising as the sole (and greatest) form of revenue. Why? Because print advertising was based on a model of scarcity and the Internet is a model of complete abundance. Still, Quartz may have a shot, and here’s why.” (Mitch for Hugh).

Now it’s your turn: in the comment section below pick one thing that you saw this week that inspired you and share it.

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Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #153

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, Solve For Interesting, the author of Complete Web Monitori…

Reinventing You With Dorie Clark

Episode #357 of Six Pixels of Separation – The Twist Image Podcast is now live and ready for you to listen to.

How important is a personal brand? Is that phrase even able to stay alive in this day and age? There is no doubt that our individual reputa…

Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #132

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, the author of Complete Web Monitoring and Managing Bandwid…

In The Trust Economy, Marketers Are Bankrupt

It’s getting ugly for marketers. Too bad, because marketing is just starting to get good.

We have a major issue with marketing and it needs to get solved soon if our future it to be as bright as we hope. Bottom line: marketers need to prove the busine…

Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #89

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, the author of Complete Web Monitoring and Managing Bandwid…

Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #80

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, the author of Complete Web Monitoring and Managing Bandwid…

Where The Consumers Are

Consumers are not just people who see media and advertising.

In my first business book, Six Pixels of Separation, I recount the story of a friend who was looking to launch a retail endeavor. They were spending countless hours scoping out locations, sp…

Six Links Worthy Of Your Attention #78

Is there one link, story, picture or thought that you saw online this week that you think somebody you know must see?

My friends: Alistair Croll (BitCurrent, Year One Labs, GigaOM, Human 2.0, the author of Complete Web Monitoring and Managing Bandwid…